Electrolux Newsroom Asia Pacific

Celebrating a shared passion for food on both sides of the causeway

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Although they share the same name, dishes like Hokkien mee can look and even taste different on either side of the Causeway.Although they share the same name, dishes like Hokkien mee can look and even taste different on either side of the Causeway.Specially created by Electrolux Chef-in-Residence Chef E, the Nonya-inspired Kaffir Lime Leaf Chicken recipe contains both Malaysian and Singaporean ingredients and cooking methods.

August marks  a month of celebrations  for Singapore and Malaysia, with their national days falling on 9 and 31 August respectively.

Although separated in 1965, a look at popular local dishes in both countries suggests that 47 years apart has had little effect on their shared culinary heritage.

SG hokkien meeKL Hokkien mee

Photo Credit: HC Phua & Chyme88

Although they share the same name, dishes like Hokkien mee can look and even taste different on either side of the Causeway.

Malaysian food can be said to bear many similarities to Indonesian cuisine, especially from the Sumatran region. Over the years, its culinary traditions have been influenced by other regional cultures from Thailand, India and China. Many traditional Malay dishes revolve around a spice paste or mix called a rempah, which is made by grinding herbs and spices together before sautéing the mix in oil to draw out their aromas.

Singapore, which is similarly multicultural, draws its culinary heritage mainly from Chinese, Malaysian, Indonesian and Indian cuisines, although other regional influences have been incorporated over the years.

The shared food culture hasn’t stopped chefs in both countries from creating their own versions of beloved local dishes. Take the Hokkien mee dish. In Singapore, it is stir-fried with prawns, fish cake, bean sprouts, egg and rice noodles, and is lighter in colour. In Malaysia’s capital, Kuala Lumpur, the same dish is stir-fried with chicken, squid, cabbage and thick yellow noodles in dark soy sauce, giving it its distinctive black look.

Kaffir lime leaf chicken

By Eric Low

Specially created by Electrolux Chef-in-Residence Chef E, the Nonya-inspired Kaffir Lime Leaf Chicken recipe contains both Malaysian and Singaporean ingredients and cooking methods.

To celebrate this shared culinary heritage. Electrolux’s own Chef-in-Residence, Chef E, has created a tasty Kaffir Lime Leaf Chicken recipe for fans of The Little White Book Facebook page. Utilising several distinct nonya cooking ingredients like kaffir lime leaves and buah keras (candlenuts), the dish features a rempah spice paste and is stir-fried in a wok. The dish is best served with white rice or nasi lemak (coconut rice).

To get the authentic taste of dishes on both sides of the causeway, cooking hobs like the Electrolux Brio can replicate the distinctive smoky “wok-hei” taste found in popular street food stalls. With a powerful wok burner designed to direct an intense heat towards the wok,  the Brio is an ideal addition to the kitchen for local foodies in both Malaysia and Singapore.

Have more questions on whipping up local cuisines? Head over to The Little White Book’s Chef E page on Facebook to get some answers!

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